KENYAN ACTOR PHILIP MUCHIRI SIGNS AS NABA LIFE FOUNDATION AMBASSADOR

Philip Muchiri

 

Philip ‘Mentor’ Muchiri, an ambitious, energetic and career minded film producer cum actor who strives to excel in the role he is assigned to, has signed as the Kenyan Ambassador for NABA LIFE FOUNDATION, a registered non-governmental organisation in Ghana.

“I am happy to join NABA Life Foundation as they are implementing great initiatives to help the less privileged in Ghana. I want to be part and will do my best to support an organization that seeks to help the under privileged in the society”, he stated.

Apart from the acting career, Philip Muchiri has developed the passion in giving back to his people, creating a hope for a better today and an even better tomorrow for people especially children.

He said “I will use my influence in Filmmaking to show together we can rise for the better and together we can change the world in our own small deeds of helping each other and caring for the less privileged in our society”.

Philip Muchiri has passion in acting and was involved in script writing, directing, editing and playing lead roles. He also studied digital editing as well and has experience in production and holds a brown belt in Karate.

He has featured in movies like GICAGI, Mtaani, Street Game, The Blessed Child and Boda Boda, among others. He has won several awards including Best Cinematography in Gicagi Film 2014, Best Lead Actor in Boda Boda, Riverwood Academy Award 2015, etc.

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1,000 African Entrepreneurs Join $100M Tony Elumelu Programme

The Tony Elumelu Foundation (TEF) has announced the selection of the second set of 1,000 entrepreneurs for the 2016 cycle of the Tony Elumelu Entrepreneurship Programme (TEEP).

Launched in 2015, TEEP is the largest African philanthropic initiative devoted to entrepreneurship and represents a 10-year, $100 million commitment, to identify and empower 10,000 African entrepreneurs, create a million jobs and add $10 billion in revenues to Africa’s economy.

Over 45,000 entrepreneurs from 54 African countries applied, nearly doubling the number of applications received in 2015. Successful candidates represent 53 African countries, and diverse industries, led by agriculture and ICT.

The highest numbers of applicants came from Nigeria, Kenya, Ghana, Uganda and Cameroon. All five regions – North, East, Southern, Central and West Africa are represented.

Founder, Tony O. Elumelu, CON, commented: “In TEEP’s first year we spent over $8 million of our $100 million commitment – with $5 million going directly to entrepreneurs as seed capital — and the results have far exceeded our expectations. We have funded entrepreneurs, established networks and helped extraordinary people take control of their destinies.

The 2016 Tony Elumelu Entrepreneurs will become a generation of newly empowered African business owners, who are the clearest evidence yet, that indigenous business growth will drive Africa’s economic and social transformation.”

Over the next nine months, the 2016 cohort will receive the intensive online training, networking and mentoring that provide a tool kit for success and sustainability. They will also participate in the three-day Elumelu Entrepreneurship Forum later in the year, the largest annual gathering of African entrepreneurial talent.

Parminder Vir OBE, CEO of The Tony Elumelu Foundation, said: “We saw phenomenal success with the first cycle of TEEP –the success stories of the TEEP 2015alumni are a testament to the transformative power of the programme we have built. Through TEEP, we are proving to the next generation of entrepreneurs that their ideas can change their communities, their countries and their continent.”

For a full list of the selected Tony Elumelu Entrepreneurs for TEEP2016, do visit http://www.tonyelumelufoundation.org/teep .

Instructively, the Tony Elumelu Foundation is an Africa-based, African-funded philanthropic organisation. Founded in 2010, TEF is committed to driving African economic growth, by empowering African entrepreneurship.

The Foundation aims to create lasting solutions that contribute positively to Africa’s social and economic transformation. Through impact investments, selective grant making, and policy development, it seeks to influence the operating environment so that entrepreneurship in Africa can flourish. http://www.tonyelumelufoundation.org @tonyelumeluFDN.

While the Tony Elumelu Foundation Entrepreneurship Programme represents a decade- long commitment to supporting African start-ups and entrepreneurs. We are committing $100 million to help launch an initial 10,000 entrepreneurs throughout Africa over the next 10 years, creating 1,000,000 new jobs contributing to $10 billion in revenue across Africa.

Read more at: http://www.modernghana.com

IAAF: Two Kenyans fail drugs tests at Beijing worlds

Two Kenyans have failed pre-competition drugs tests at the world championships in Beijing and have been provisionally suspended, the IAAF announced Wednesday.

Koki Manunga and Joyce Zakary “have accepted provisional suspensions following positive samples provided in Beijing on the 20th and 21st of August respectively”, the IAAF said in a statement.

Track and field’s world governing body said the Kenyan pair had been tested at the athletes’ hotel before their competition started as part of “targeted tests”.

Zakary clocked a national record of 50.71 seconds in Monday’s first round of the women’s 400m at the Bird’s Nest, but did not start the semi-final on Tuesday for which she had qualified.

African silver medallist Manunga, however, failed to make it out of her first round of the 400m hurdles on Sunday, timing 58.96sec to finish 35th out of 37 athletes competing.

Athletics Kenya, the nation’s governing body, later confirmed that it had been “informed by the IAAF of the positive tests returned by two of its athletes, Koki Manunga and Joyce Zakary”.

“Athletics Kenya has already met with the IAAF and the athletes involved, and has begun investigating the situation which led to these results and appropriate follow-up action will be taken in Kenya,” track and field’s governing body in the east African running powerhouse added in a statement.

“In the meantime, Athletics Kenya will provide full support and cooperation to the IAAF during results management process.”

Kenya was rocked this year when marathon star Rita Jeptoo was banned for two years after being caught doping with the banned blood-boosting hormone EPO.

Jeptoo is the biggest name in Kenyan sports ever to have been caught, and the bust has been a major trauma for a country that idolises its medal-winning and record-breaking runners.

Top Kenyan athletes earlier this month called for the national governing body, the International Association of Athletics Federation and the world’s anti-doping body WADA to take action over reports of widespread doping.

Leaked results cited by German broadcaster ARD and the Sunday Times claimed that more than 800 athletes, including 18 Kenyans, had “suspicious blood test results” between 2001 and 2012.

ARD alleged doping was ongoing in Kenya, and claimed there was “massive corruption” within the Kenyan set-up and “a desire to cover-up doping… to the summit of the Kenyan athletics federation”.

Athletics Kenya said it had “watched with grave concern the German TV ARD documentary”, calling the broadcast, which coincided with the national trials for the world championships in Beijing, “extremely suspect and ill motivated”.

Source: AFP

Inside Kenya: Global donor raises red flag on Kenya’s ability to absorb funds

The Global Fund is concerned about the country’s slow pace in absorbing HIV, malaria and tuberculosis grants and wants specific targets met by the end of this year.

In its first audit with the Jubilee government, the fund gave Kenya a qualified approval and called for improvement in governance, management and oversight.

“Auditors from the Office of the Inspector General rated the management of financial, health services and product risks as ‘generally effective’ in Kenya,” says the report.

The last audit was published in 2012 with the fund demanding the country refund some Sh270 million which it said had not been properly accounted for.

However, since then the fund no longer makes public specific incidents of fraud preferring to discuss this with recipients behind closed doors.

It came out that internal controls, governance and risk management processes were not effective. “No plan to address the issues was in place at the time of audit,” shows the report.

The fund is especially concerned over disruptions brought about by the devolution of the health sector which led to the stock-out of TB drugs last year in the counties.

The audit indicates $3 million (Sh302.8 million) had been released to the counties in 2013-14 for the purchase of TB medicines but this was not done. The fund also wants a national TB prevalence survey which it says has been delayed since 2011.

Also of concern was the low utilisation of mosquito nets for the protection against malaria. Bed nets constitute the biggest component for malaria funding, 37 per cent, and the fund recommends the speedy collection of data to inform on their utilisation.

The audit identifies a $96 million (Sh9.7 billion) funding gap for anti-retrovirals by next year which it says had not been addressed by the time of the exercise.

Source: http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/health/article/2000172496/global-donor-raises-red-flag-on-kenya-s-ability-to-absorb-funds

Did You Know: Kenyan babies were named “AirforceOne” to honor Obama’s visit

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Obama’s trip to Kenya had some residents so thrilled they named their new babies after the president. And at least two babies were named after the president’s airplane.

Born Friday, little AirForceOne Barack Obama was one of eight babies born in the city of Kisumu during the president’s recent visit.

‘I have decided to call my baby AirForceOne Barack Obama so that we can all remember Obama’s visit to Kenya because it is a huge blessing,’ Lucy Akinyi Okoth, one of the mothers, told AFP.

Another mother went short and sweet, naming her boy AirForce One.
‘I have been told that it is the best aeroplane because it carries a very powerful leader of America who is also a Kenyan,’ Lucy Atieno explained.

In addition to the takes on the president’s (and his plane’s) name, three girls also got Obama-related names.
One was named Michelle , another was called Malia and a third was named Malia Sasha after both Obama girls.

‘I could not call my daughter any other name,’ said Wilkister Anyango, new mother to Malia Sasha.

Fulfilling the hopes of millions of Kenyans, Barack Obama returned to his father’s homeland Friday for the first time as U.S. president, a long sought visit by a country that considers him a local son.

Source: Daily Mail

Photos: Kenya-U.S. Uhuru-Obama Joint Press Conference

 U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a joint press conference with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a joint press conference with Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta speaks during a joint press conference with visiting U.S. President Barack Obama in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)
Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta speaks during a joint press conference with visiting U.S. President Barack Obama in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)

U.S. President Barack Obama (L) and his Kenyan counterpart Uhuru Kenyatta leave after their joint press conference in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)
U.S. President Barack Obama (L) and his Kenyan counterpart Uhuru Kenyatta leave after their joint press conference in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)

U.S. President Barack Obama(L) and his Kenyan counterpart Uhuru Kenyatta attend a joint press conference in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015.  Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)
U.S. President Barack Obama(L) and his Kenyan counterpart Uhuru Kenyatta attend a joint press conference in Nairobi, Kenya, July 25, 2015. Kenya and the U.S. on Saturday reaffirmed their commitment on security cooperation and in the war against terrorism to help prevent future terror attacks in the East African nation. (Xinhua/Sun Ruibo)

Source: Xinhuanet.com

Photos: Top Ten Outstanding Male Musicians in Africa

Music has been an integral part of the entertainment sector in Africa aside filming. Most of the musicians in
Africa have performed spectacularly in their respective countries, in other countries and world wide with the idea of selling Africa.

The genre of music they do include High-life, Hip-Life, “Dance-hall”, Afro-Pop, Hip-Hop, Gospel, reggae, and among others. Apart from the several awards they have won, they have also produced several songs, inspired so many young people, and have grown to promote the music career in Africa.

Below, are the top ten outstanding musicians in Africa that we have compiled based on how they have extremely worked hard to take African music far.

1. SONNIE BADU

Sonnie Badu is a multiple award winning Gospel singer, songwriter, philanthropist, producer, TV presenter and author. He is arguably the most successful gospel export to emerge out of Africa in recent years. His unique blend of intimate worship, high class visuals, and his energetic style of ushering congregations into the presence of God is affecting lives worldwide.

In 2009, he received numerous honors and accolades for his contribution to the gospel community, winning a BEFFTA (Black Entertainment Fashion and Film Award) in the category of Best Gospel Artist. He was also the recipient of three awards at the Gospel Music Awards Italy in the categories of Best Gospel Artist in Europe, Best Worship Artist of the year and Best Worship song for the smash hit single ‘Covenant Keeping God’ and to crown the year, he was decorated the Best Gospel Male at the British Gospel Music Awards.

In 2008 he launched the annual ‘Sonnie Badu Worships’ program. So far the event has been held in London, Germany, Italy, Ireland, New York, Maryland, Atlanta, Virginia, New Jersey, Ohio, Texas, Ghana and Canada and its reputations continues to spread with more nations coming on board in the new year.

2. D’BANJ

Oladapo Daniel Oyebanjo (popularly known as D’banj, born 9 June 1980) is a Nigerian singer-songwriter, harmonica player, and businessman. He has won several music awards, including the awards for Best African Act at the MTV Europe Music Awards 2007, Artist of the Year at the MTV Africa Music Awards 2009, Best International Act: Africa at the 2011 BET Awards, and Best-selling African Artist at the 2014 World Music Awards.

He adopted the stage name D’banj, a combination of his first name Dapo and his surname Oyebanjo. D’banj is currently best known internationally for his 2012 summer hit “Oliver Twist”, an uptempo dance fusion of Afrobeat and electronic dance music that topped the African charts 2011 and was a top 10 hit in the UK singles chart in 2012 reaching No. 2 on the UK R&B chart. Apart from the music career, D’banj is the founder of Koko Foundation for Youth and Peace Development and also Nigeria’s first United Nations Youth Ambassador for Peace.

3. SARKODIE

Michael Owusu Addo, popularly known by his stage name Sarkodie, is a Ghanaian hip hop and hip-life recording artist from Tema. He won the Best International Act: Africa category at the 2012 BET Awards, and was nominated in the same category at the 2014 BET Awards.In 2015, Sarkodie was ranked the 19th most Influential Ghanaian by e-TV Ghana.He is considered one of the major proponents of the Azonto genre and dance and often named as one of Africa’s greatest Hip pop artists.

On July 13, 2013, Sarkodie launched “The Sarkodie Foundation” which is tasked with the mission of supporting underprivileged children. He has also established himself as a successful entrepreneur and owns “Sark by Yas clothing line”, which was launched on April 27, 2013.

4. AYUB OGADA

Ayub Ogada was born in 1956 in Mombasa, Kenya. He is a descendant of the Luo people of western Kenya and was influenced by their musical heritage by his parents who were musicians. They performed Luo music to Kenyan and US audiences. Ayub’s experience of travelling with his parents to the US and his exposure to both western and African cultures had a profound effect on his music and outlook.

Ayub was invited to take part in one of the ‘recording weeks’ at Peter Gabriel’s Real World Studios in Wiltshire. In 1993, he recorded his first album En Mana Kuoyo (Just Sand) at the studio and he toured extensively with Peter Gabriel and WOMAD.

Ayub’s music is on the soundtracks of films such as ‘I Dreamed of Africa’ (2000), ‘The Constant Gardener’ (2005) and ‘Samsara’ (2011). His music was also used in the soundtrack for Ewan McGregor and Charlie Boorman’s BBC series Long Way Round and Long Way Down.

5. STANLEY ENOW

Stanley Ebai Enow is a Cameroonian rapper who is best known for his 2013 single “Hein Père”.He has received several nominations and subsequently won the Best New Act category at the 2014 MTV Africa Music Awards.
Enow was born in Bamenda, the capital of the Northwest Region of Cameroon. He started writing rap lyrics and break-dancing while in high school and has since become a very great musician in Cameroon and in Africa as well.

6. AKA

Kiernan Jordan Forbes (born 28 January 1988), better known by his stage name AKA, is a South African rapper originally from Cape Town. AKA ventured for a solo career with hits like “Mistakes”, “In My Walk” and “Do It” with the latter making it to number 1 on the South African 5FM Top 40.

He won Metro FM Music Awards for “Best Newcomer”, “Best Hip Hop” as a solo act and “Best Produced Album” for his debut Altar Ego. He was also dubbed “Prince of South African Rap” by one of the national newspapers and won “Best Dressed man” during the GQ Awards in South Africa alongside Oscar Pistorius. He is very talented, determined and a;ways bring the best rap for his fans.

7. HARRY KIMANI

Harrison Mungai “Harry” Kimani (b. ca. 1982) is a Kenyan musician and composer. Kimani grew up with music, teaching himself to play the guitar by watching an older brother perform. He attended Kirangari High School in Nairobi, where he already showed a great interest in music; he sang, composed songs, participated in music festivals and, at one time, conducted the school choir.

His first love in high school inspired him to compose a song called “African Woman,” which was well received among his friends; they urged him to record the song. In 2005, he won Kisima Music Awards for Best Music Video & Best Song and was nominated in the same year for Kora Awards – Most Promising Male Artiste.

8. 2FACE IDIBIA

Innocent Ujah Idibia (born in Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria), better known by his stage name 2face Idibia, is a Nigerian singer, songwriter and record producer. He officially discontinued the use of the name Tuface and selected Tu-baba as his stage name. He is one of the most decorated and successful Afro pop artists in Africa. He is also one of the most bankable artists in Africa.

2Face has received one MTV Europe Music Award, one World Music Award, five Headies Awards (Hip-hop award), four Channel O Music Video Awards and one BET award for his musical work, four MTV Africa Music Awards, one MOBO award, one KORA award, and numerous additional nominations.

9. DADDY LUMBA

He was born as Charles Kwadwo Fosuh in Nsuta near Mampong in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. In the early 1980s, he debuted on the highlife scene with his massive hit “Yeeye Aka Akwantuo Mu” with Nana Acheampong (known together as ‘Lumba Brothers’).

In 1999, he won three awards including best album and the most popular song of the year at the Ghana Music Awards. Before the year 2002, Daddy came out every year with a hit album. Daddy Lumba has won several Ghana Music Awards and other excellence awards and continue to appeal to the young and old. He is old, but with passion and talent at heart, his music career is still growing and always bring out the best for Ghanaians and Africans.

10. SUNDAYGAR DEARBOY

Michael Davies (born July 20, 1972), popularly known by his stage name Sundaygar Dearboy, is a Liberian hipco singer, songwriter and record producer from District 2, Grand Bassa County. He records primarily in Bassa and Liberian English; he has released several contemporary gospel songs. Dearboy has released several studio albums, including See Boyee, Don’t Live With Woman (2007) and Rebirth (2012). He was named the Liberian Musician of the Year in 2005 and 2006.

He revived his music career by releasing “Bayjay”, a song endorsed by the Liberian populace. The song won the Song of the Year award at the 2005 Liberian Entertainment Awards

Source: Compilation by AllAboutAfrica

Kenya to reopen border points to curb entry of contraband goods

Kenya

The Kenyan government on Friday said it will re-open some border points with Somalia in three northeastern counties to help restrict entry of contraband goods, especially sugar, into the country.

Northeastern Regional Commissioner, Mohamud Saleh, said illicit sugar, foodstuffs and even weapons are finding ways into the country.

“We shall open between one and two border points in the three counties of Mandera, Wajir and Garissa,” Saleh told a public forum in Mandera town.

He said the border points will be manned by Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA), Kenya Bureau of Standards (KEBs) and other relevant government agencies to ensure the goods and services entering the country are inspected and taxed while concealed weapons stopped.

“The government will earn revenue and ensure that all goods entering the country meet our standards,” the official said.

Saleh warned rogue police officers and other government officials who are colluding with unscrupulous businessmen in smuggling.

Smuggling of sugar has been rampant along the Kenya-Somalia border since 1990s. It has created an “untouchable” community of millionaires, mainly Kenyan Somali traders, who are protected by a ragtag army in their trade deals.

Kenya produces 500,000 metric tonnes of sugar annually, while the consumption is about 800,000 metric tonnes, leaving a shortfall of 300,000 metric tonnes. The shortfall is supposed to be imported from the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (Comesa) region.

The illicit sugar business is also believed to be a key income for the militant group Al-Shabaab.

Source: Spy Ghana

Inside Africa: Tanzania outlines measures to curb deadly maize disease

Tanzania on Friday announced measures to scale down the impact of Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease (MLND), a viral disease that threatens food security in the East African nation.

Dr. Fidelis Myaka, Director of Research and Development in the Tanzania’s Ministry of Agriculture, Food Security and Cooperatives, said northern part of the country is the highly affected area with the maize disease.

He cited Arusha, Manyara and Kilimanjaro as the highly affected regions with the disease, which landed in Tanzania three years ago through neighboring Kenya.

“As government, we’re working closely with key players, particularly those working in research and seed industry on the need for them to seriously take part in the fight against the deadly virus,” Myaka said. “We have put under quarantine MLND affected areas so that the disease couldn’t spread into others potential areas like the southern highlands’ regions.”

“In our studies, we came to learn that Mbeya, Rukwa, Iringa and Ruvuma as the regions which haven’t affected by the maize disease. That’s why we are encouraging seed breeders to produce seeds in those areas and supply in other areas,” the official said.

According to Myaka, it is strictly prohibited for seed breeders in northern Tanzania to supply seeds into other areas, because it is proved that the virus of the disease is supplied by seeds, particularly those produced in the affected areas.

“We are trying to protect the southern highlands’ region from this new and deadly viral crop disease, because they are being the leading maize producing regions in the country,” said Dr. Arnold Mushongi, a senior maize researcher from the Agricultural Research Institute (ARI).

Mushongi described the MLND as a major concern for scientists, researchers, seed breeders and ordinary people and governments in general because of its negative impacts.

“That’s why we’re embracing a number of players in addressing this disease, which is still a threat to food security in northern Tanzania and the country as a whole,” he said.

“We have started training farmers on how to go about the disease as well as embracing best agronomic management practices in maize farms,” he said.

Kheri Kitenge, another maize researcher at the Arusha-based Selian Agricultural Research Institute (SARI), also suggested the need for the government to strengthen quarantines in areas critically affected by the viral disease.

Kitenge said that maize seed is one of the key important tools towards the spread of the disease, suggesting the need for seed breeders not to supply seeds from the affected areas into the MNLD- free areas.

“We are encouraging farmers to embrace shifting cultivation techniques in farming systems as one of the ways to curb the disease,” he said.

Source: SpyGhana.com