Black Panther stars head to South Africa

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While we are sure Cyril Ramaphosa’s state of the nation address this evening will be gripping viewing, we suspect it may be somewhat overshadowed by another event.

The stars of the much-anticipated Black Panther film are due to descend on Johannesburg this evening for its South African premiere.

Among those walking the red carpet will be Kenya’s Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o and Danai Gurira, best-known for her role in hit show The Walking Dead.

And it seems they are just as excited to head for South Africa as South Africa is to see them

The film is expected to roll out worldwide in mid-February. The premiere in Kenya will be on Tuesday, February 13 and in South Africa, on Friday, February 16.

Movie enthusiasts in Europe attended the premiere last week on Thursday at London’s Eventim Apollo and it was absolutely amazing. Why? First, because the actors of the film were present plus a number of other celebrities.

The best part is what those who attended wore to the event. The stars and even the fans.

Black Panther is seen as a very important film for children to watch because it informs them that black people can be heroes too.

And the Black Panther soundtrack is also out.

Click on this link to watch the video

Source: BBC

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18 killed, 239 injured in South Africa passenger train crash

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A passenger train slammed into a truck in South Africa’s Free State province on Thursday, killing 18 people and injuring 239 others.
The Emergency Services confirmed that the Shosholoza Meyl Train 37012 was traveling from Port Elizabeth to Johannesburg, when it hit a truck at Jeneva level crossing between Henneman and Kroonstad in Free State province.
Transport Minister Joe Maswanganyi said the derailment left 18 people burned to death and 239 injured.
Firefighters and medical personnel have rushed to the scene to help the victims.
Footages sent by passengers from the scene shows a number of carriages laid on the ground and engulfed in flames.

Source: Xinhua

Early HIV vaccine results lead to major trial: researchers

WAAF Team member testing a community member to know status

Durban (South Africa) (AFP) – Promising results from an early safety trial with a potential HIV vaccine have paved the way for a major new study, researchers announced at the International AIDS Conference in Durban on Tuesday.

An 18-month trial with a candidate vaccine dubbed HVTN100 drew on 252 participants at six sites in South Africa, one of the countries hardest-hit by an epidemic that has claimed more than 30 million lives worldwide since the 1980s.

The participants fell within a low-risk category for contracting the sexually-transmitted virus, the researchers said.

The trial cleared a key hurdle in the long, three-phase process to test new drugs. In this early phase, the main point is to assess safety, not efficacy.

“We wanted to see if this vaccine candidate is safe in a South African population and if it is tolerable,” Kathy Mngadi, principal investigator at one of the research sites, explained to AFP.

The team also looked for antibodies signalling that the body’s immune system was responding to the vaccine.

The trial built on the foundations laid by a groundbreaking trial conducted in Thailand in 2009, which yielded the world’s first partially effective vaccine, dubbed RV144.

While hailed as a breakthrough, the effect of the Thai course decreased with time, dropping from 60 percent after one year to 31.2 percent after three-and-a-half years.

“RV144 set us on this journey of hope, but also showed us what we still need to learn and accomplish in this field,” said Fatima Laher, co-chair of the HVTN100 trial.

– Next step –

All the study criteria “were met unequivocally and, in many instances, the HVTN100 outcomes exceeded both our own criteria,” added trial protocol chair Linda-Gail Bekker.

The next phase of the trial, dubbed HVTN702, will kick off in November with the recruitment of 5,400 South African men and women aged between 18 to 25 at high risk of contracting HIV.

People are divided into risk categories through criteria that includes their sexual activity.

“We hope to have results in five years, and it is going to be a very exciting five years for all of us because it is the result of many, many years of hard work,” said Glenda Gray, HVTN Africa programme director.

A fully effective vaccine is still a long way off, she cautioned.

But recent studies have shown that even a partially effective blocker could have a huge impact if rolled out on a large scale.

Some two-and-a-half million people are still becoming infected with HIV every year, according to a new study published on Tuesday, even as drugs have slashed the death rate and virus-carriers live ever longer on anti-retroviral treatment.

While the quest for a cure continues, many view a vaccine as the best hope for stemming new infections.

Larry Corey, principal investigator for the HIV Vaccine Trials Network, a publicly-funded international project, said vaccines were barely mentioned the last time the conference was held in Durban some 16 years ago.

“It’s really gratifying now to see how far we’ve come scientifically,” he said.

Last year, billionaire and philanthropist Bill Gates, who spends millions of dollars on AIDS drug development, said he hoped for an HIV vaccine within a decade, as a cure seems less likely.

Archbishop Desmond Tutu hospitalised

Desmond Tutu

South Africa’s retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu has been admitted to a Cape Town hospital for a persistent infection, his foundation said.

The foundation, which is named after 83-year-old Tutu and his wife Leah, quoted their daughter Mpho as saying on Tuesday that the family hopes the Nobel Peace Prize laureate will be able to return home in a “day or two.”

Desmond Tutu has been treated for prostate cancer for many years. He announced his retirement from public life in 2011, but has still traveled widely and made public appearances.

Tutu, who was awarded the Nobel peace prize in 1984 for campaigning against apartheid, renewed his wedding vows with Leah earlier this month after 60 years of marriage. The family held ceremonies in Cape Town and Johannesburg to mark the occasion.

An Associated Press reporter attended the Johannesburg ceremony in the Holy Cross Anglican Church in the city’s Soweto area, where Tutu used to live.

Tutu danced stiffly as choristers sang and was frequently on his feet, thanking the congregants at the end of the three-hour event. At other times, he sat with his eyes closed.

“His family hopes he will be able to return home in a day or two,” said the statement.

The anti-apartheid icon last December cancelled plans to travel to a meeting of Nobel laureates in Rome, in order to battle prostate cancer which he has lived with for 15 years.

In 2011 he was hospitalised for “minor” elective surgery.

He was hospitalised again in 2013 year for a persistent infection, but tests at that time showed no new malignancy.

Tutu survived an illness believed to be polio as a baby and battled tuberculosis as a teenager.

Source: Agencies